One of DNA’s original aims has been to contribute to dystonia research. A wonderful community in Maryborough, Victoria helped make this a reality. In 2021 they raised funds for dystonia research with activities including a walkathon, morning tea and plant sale. A total of $4700 was raised and we are very grateful to the Goldfields Family Centre and the Maryborough community for their contributions and wish to give particular thanks to Trish Ipsen and Wendy Powell. It was decided that the funds raised would go towards a grant for an Australian PhD student who is conducting research into dystonia. DNA provided further funds and as a result two PhD students were awarded top up grants of $5000 each towards their worthy projects.

Jordan Morrison-Ham

Jordan is a PhD student at Deakin University, Melbourne and is employed as a university tutor and research assistant at the Cognitive Neuroscience Unit at the university’s School of Psychology. She has a Bachelor of Psychological Science (with first class honours) from Deakin University. 

Jordan’s research project aims to determine whether non-invasive brain stimulation techniques can be used to treat cervical dystonia. She is currently recruiting people with cervical dystonia to take part in the trial. Jordan explains her project in a short video here.

Dr Joel Maamary

Joel is a PhD student at the University of NSW and is employed in the Department of Neurology at St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney. He has a Bachelor of Medicine/Bachelor of Surgery (Hons 1, University Medal) from the University of Notre Dame and a Bachelor of Applied Science (Physiotherapy)(Hons 1) from the University of Sydney.

Joel is the lead study author in a trial involving an evaluation of the safety and efficacy of MRI guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) in focal hand dystonia. This is a novel treatment approach for people with focal hand dystonia. Joel explains his project in a short video here.

DNA would like to thank Jordan and Joel for their videos and we wish them all the best with their research.